vrai-lean-uh

Cooking, eating, making sweeping pronouncements

Posts tagged bon appetit

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Readability
I don’t mean to be a jerk to Bon Appetit. I don’t. I subscribe, I read the magazine, I enjoy cooking quite a few of their recipes. Truly.
And then I got to page 28 and I just…
I took a picture because I think it’s hard to really explain the scope of the problem without an illustration. What you’re seeing above is an article about encouraging kids to appreciate fish. The headline is “Hook, Line, and Dinner.” It’s printed over a black and white photo of a small child holding up a fish. Did you have a hard time reading it? Perhaps because they printed it IN WHITE TEXT ON A WHITE BACKGROUND.
I am interested in the story about encouraging one’s child to eat fish! But not if it’s printed it IN INVISIBLE INK.
So here’s my PSA: there are lots of people out there in the world with low vision. There are quite a few people who would never, ever think of themselves as having a disability who have low vision. And there are those of us who think we have perfectly fine vision but want to read our magazine before bed and don’t want to turn on the super bright overhead light because it creates an un-restful sleep environment and getting a full night’s sleep is very important so are reading at night with a moderately dim bedside lamp and thus cannot read a damn thing when there is basically no difference in color or tone between the background and foreground text.
If you have bothered to write something, make it readable.
Here’s a really nice resource.
This makes me annoyed not just because I hate having to work harder than necessary. It makes me annoyed because someone made a design choice that pretty explicitly excludes a large portion of our population. I don’t want to live in a society that systematically excludes certain people who don’t fit our view of what “normal” looks like.
Maybe someone with low vision wants to figure out how to encourage their kids to eat fish. They should be able to do that.
It wouldn’t have been any more work to make this accessible. Having low vision should not keep you from reading and enjoying and complaining about Bon Appetit.

Readability

I don’t mean to be a jerk to Bon Appetit. I don’t. I subscribe, I read the magazine, I enjoy cooking quite a few of their recipes. Truly.

And then I got to page 28 and I just…

I took a picture because I think it’s hard to really explain the scope of the problem without an illustration. What you’re seeing above is an article about encouraging kids to appreciate fish. The headline is “Hook, Line, and Dinner.” It’s printed over a black and white photo of a small child holding up a fish. Did you have a hard time reading it? Perhaps because they printed it IN WHITE TEXT ON A WHITE BACKGROUND.

I am interested in the story about encouraging one’s child to eat fish! But not if it’s printed it IN INVISIBLE INK.

So here’s my PSA: there are lots of people out there in the world with low vision. There are quite a few people who would never, ever think of themselves as having a disability who have low vision. And there are those of us who think we have perfectly fine vision but want to read our magazine before bed and don’t want to turn on the super bright overhead light because it creates an un-restful sleep environment and getting a full night’s sleep is very important so are reading at night with a moderately dim bedside lamp and thus cannot read a damn thing when there is basically no difference in color or tone between the background and foreground text.

If you have bothered to write something, make it readable.

Here’s a really nice resource.

This makes me annoyed not just because I hate having to work harder than necessary. It makes me annoyed because someone made a design choice that pretty explicitly excludes a large portion of our population. I don’t want to live in a society that systematically excludes certain people who don’t fit our view of what “normal” looks like.

Maybe someone with low vision wants to figure out how to encourage their kids to eat fish. They should be able to do that.

It wouldn’t have been any more work to make this accessible. Having low vision should not keep you from reading and enjoying and complaining about Bon Appetit.

Filed under bon appetit jesus christ

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Photo by Boru O’Brien O’Connell for Bon Appetit
I had more or less decided to cancel my Bon Appetit subscription and then I opened the June issue and came across this interview with Sir Patrick Stewart.
"There is nothing nicer than coming offstage, opening [a bottle of white wine], and sitting quietly."
Do you know how I feel about sitting quietly with a glass of white wine? It is my favorite thing. I disagree with him about mushrooms (his take: “slimy and old-tasting;” my take: “slimy and old-tasting and delicious”) but I’m willing to let that slide.

Photo by Boru O’Brien O’Connell for Bon Appetit

I had more or less decided to cancel my Bon Appetit subscription and then I opened the June issue and came across this interview with Sir Patrick Stewart.

"There is nothing nicer than coming offstage, opening [a bottle of white wine], and sitting quietly."

Do you know how I feel about sitting quietly with a glass of white wine? It is my favorite thing. I disagree with him about mushrooms (his take: “slimy and old-tasting;” my take: “slimy and old-tasting and delicious”) but I’m willing to let that slide.

Filed under sir patrick stewart bon appetit sitting quietly

8 notes

Please excuse my really unattractive phone photo.
Oh, Bon Appetit. The January Editor’s Letter was terrible. But the January issues in general tend to be my favorite, with more interesting, simple, healthy-ish recipes than usual, and this one had a bunch of appealing recipes. And honestly, I’ve come to really enjoy hate-reading certain sections, so it’s positive all around.
I think this is actually a breakfast. I mean, the recipes were part of a feature on Japanese-style breakfasts. I ate it for dinner. It was great.
This meal includes a bunch of component parts, so it’s not one of those whip-up-in-20-minutes-from-start-to-finish meals. But all of the component parts are easy, and almost all can be done in advance.
For this I made: rice (I want to say I used our rice cooker, which I enjoy enormously, but probably I just made instant rice), teriyaki sauce, braised kale, teriyaki mushrooms, poached salmon. The teriyaki sauce is fantastic. I’m sad that I’m 31 and just now discovering it.
The full recipes are over here.
For some reason I rarely make braised kale, even though I love it. I’ve been hearing people talk about being “over” kale a lot lately, and I could just be very behind the times (I am), but I am NOT over kale. I love cooked kale. It is my favorite hearty green by far. So that’s where I stand on that controversy.

Braised kale:
Wash your kale and remove the stems. Chop. Dump into a large pan with a little bit of chicken stock and a bit of butter. Simmer, tossing with tongs, until cooked. Or just leave the kale leaves a little bit wet, and put some olive oil in the pan, and cook, tossing, until done.

And here’s a recipe for teriyaki poached salmon, which is really delicious and a very un-smelly way of cooking salmon (as opposed to every single other way of cooking salmon, which doesn’t keep me from cooking salmon, but I know it does for some of you). I will tell you the secret of all salmon right now: don’t overcook it. Overcooked salmon is disgusting. When you flake it to see if it’s done, you want it to be still a bit dark pink in the middle. I’m not telling you to eat totally raw salmon, but if it’s all opaque and light pink throughout, it’s not going to be very good. So in the recipe, when you read “until opaque in the middle,” I just want you to feel like you can ignore that.

Poached Salmon (with Teriyaki)
Bring an inch and a half of water to boil in a pan. Add a lot of salt, and turn down the heat so it’s simmering. Add the salmon. Cover and simmer until done, 5 - 10 minutes. Remove salmon to a shallow bowl and pour teriyaki sauce over.

And the Teriyaki Sauce, which you should make now and just have in your fridge ready for any teriyaki opportunity that should present itself.

Teriyaki Sauce
Combine 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 1 cup mirin (I had some yuzu rice vinegar in the cabinet from approximately eight million years ago, so I used that and it was fantastic), and 1 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce in a small saucepan. Simmer for 40 - 50 minutes, until slightly thickened. Apparently this will keep for a month in your fridge.

Please excuse my really unattractive phone photo.

Oh, Bon Appetit. The January Editor’s Letter was terrible. But the January issues in general tend to be my favorite, with more interesting, simple, healthy-ish recipes than usual, and this one had a bunch of appealing recipes. And honestly, I’ve come to really enjoy hate-reading certain sections, so it’s positive all around.

I think this is actually a breakfast. I mean, the recipes were part of a feature on Japanese-style breakfasts. I ate it for dinner. It was great.

This meal includes a bunch of component parts, so it’s not one of those whip-up-in-20-minutes-from-start-to-finish meals. But all of the component parts are easy, and almost all can be done in advance.

For this I made: rice (I want to say I used our rice cooker, which I enjoy enormously, but probably I just made instant rice), teriyaki sauce, braised kale, teriyaki mushrooms, poached salmon. The teriyaki sauce is fantastic. I’m sad that I’m 31 and just now discovering it.

The full recipes are over here.

For some reason I rarely make braised kale, even though I love it. I’ve been hearing people talk about being “over” kale a lot lately, and I could just be very behind the times (I am), but I am NOT over kale. I love cooked kale. It is my favorite hearty green by far. So that’s where I stand on that controversy.

Braised kale:

Wash your kale and remove the stems. Chop. Dump into a large pan with a little bit of chicken stock and a bit of butter. Simmer, tossing with tongs, until cooked. Or just leave the kale leaves a little bit wet, and put some olive oil in the pan, and cook, tossing, until done.

And here’s a recipe for teriyaki poached salmon, which is really delicious and a very un-smelly way of cooking salmon (as opposed to every single other way of cooking salmon, which doesn’t keep me from cooking salmon, but I know it does for some of you). I will tell you the secret of all salmon right now: don’t overcook it. Overcooked salmon is disgusting. When you flake it to see if it’s done, you want it to be still a bit dark pink in the middle. I’m not telling you to eat totally raw salmon, but if it’s all opaque and light pink throughout, it’s not going to be very good. So in the recipe, when you read “until opaque in the middle,” I just want you to feel like you can ignore that.

Poached Salmon (with Teriyaki)

Bring an inch and a half of water to boil in a pan. Add a lot of salt, and turn down the heat so it’s simmering. Add the salmon. Cover and simmer until done, 5 - 10 minutes. Remove salmon to a shallow bowl and pour teriyaki sauce over.

And the Teriyaki Sauce, which you should make now and just have in your fridge ready for any teriyaki opportunity that should present itself.

Teriyaki Sauce

Combine 1 cup brown sugar (packed), 1 cup mirin (I had some yuzu rice vinegar in the cabinet from approximately eight million years ago, so I used that and it was fantastic), and 1 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce in a small saucepan. Simmer for 40 - 50 minutes, until slightly thickened. Apparently this will keep for a month in your fridge.

Filed under teriyaki bon appetit dinner

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The Latest Bon Appetit

On the masthead page of many magazines there’s a general question and then different staff members’ answers are displayed by their names. In the June 2013 issue of Bon Appetit, the question is “What summertime dessert do you look forward to?”

Let’s all guess who would be most insufferable as a coworker:

1. “Fresh blueberry pie topped with vanilla bean Haagen-Dazs.” Also known as: I could be a normal and pleasant coworker.

2. “Humphry Slocombe’s recipe for Elvis (The Fat Years) ice cream. I love it partly for the brown sugar-banana combo, partly for the name.” Also known as: I’m going to show up to your morning meeting hungover.

3. “Just-picked strawberries in late June from Wickham’s Fruit Farm on the North Fork of Long Island. Hit ‘em with a dollop of whipped cream…and welcome summer!” Also known as: Let me tell you about how I summer on Long Island.

4. “I love getting yogurt gelato and walking through Tre Fontane when I visit Sicily in the summer.” Also known as: Let me tell you about how I summer in Sicily.

Filed under bon appetit

359 notes

So…I have been a touch critical of the new Bon Appetit tone* in the past, but the past few issues have been surprisingly good. There was a cooking school feature in January, I think, and then the dinner feature this month.
In fact, I was looking for poetry material the other day and found surprisingly little. Kudos, Bon Appetit!
* I would describe it as self-satisfied-Brooklyn-hipster-dad. 
bonappetit:

anything + french fries = a meal that gets eaten
(shot by Gentl & Hyers, Bon Appétit, March 2013)

So…I have been a touch critical of the new Bon Appetit tone* in the past, but the past few issues have been surprisingly good. There was a cooking school feature in January, I think, and then the dinner feature this month.

In fact, I was looking for poetry material the other day and found surprisingly little. Kudos, Bon Appetit!

* I would describe it as self-satisfied-Brooklyn-hipster-dad.

bonappetit:

anything + french fries = a meal that gets eaten

(shot by Gentl & Hyers, Bon Appétit, March 2013)

Filed under dinner bon appetit

3 notes

Bon Appetit Poetry: Orientalism Edition

One Night In Phuket*

Makes 4

The addition of chile transports
the lime and coconut from the Copa-
cabana to someplace even more
exotic. Infusing
the vodka couldn’t simpler,
and we love the edge
a little heat
brings to an otherwise sweet
cocktail

July 2012, p. 22

* I would like it to be noted that I did not make up that title.

Filed under bon appetit poetry