vrai-lean-uh

Cooking, eating, making sweeping pronouncements

Posts tagged cantaloupe

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A few last thoughts for Monday:

10. What if I have listeria? Do I really have to wait four weeks for symptoms? Should I freeze a chunk of my cantaloupe just in case?

Filed under cantaloupe

3 notes

Some thoughts for Monday:
1. It’s not particularly close to cantaloupe season here, but I’ve still been buying them at the grocery and they’ve been great.
2. As a kid, my parents used to just hand me a spoon and a wedge of cantaloupe and let me have at it. As an adult, I cut my cantaloupe into little wedges so I can eat them out of a bowl with a fork. Adulthood is great. (See above for the cantaloupe cutting technique, which is admittedly pretty basic. You slice the cantaloupe into wedges, cut out the seeds, make a bunch of vertical cuts, then slice along the peel, then dump your wedges into a bowl.)
3. How to tell if it’s ripe: the stem end will smell cantaloupey. The stem end should also yield slightly to pressure, but not be mushy. As a whole, your cantaloupe should not be soft or mushy. I try to find ones that are evenly tan-colored, and not green.
4. Technically, we’re eating netted muskmelons, not cantaloupes.
5. Cantaloupe is the best melon name, by far. (For comparison: watermelon, honeydew, muskmelon, bitter melon).
6. Cantaloupes tainted with listeria killed a bunch of people last year. Some people said that it was a particularly deadly outbreak because cantaloupe is an old-person food, which seems a little like kicking cantaloupe while it’s down to me.
7. The CDC recommends rinsing vegetables and scrubbing hard produce (like melons) with a produce brush to prevent a listeria infection.
8. Will scrubbing with a little brush really get rid of listeria? That seems like maybe just something that the CDC is telling us to do to feel useful, because ultimately if we’re unlucky enough to encounter listeria-tainted food we’re just kind of screwed? Or is the produce brush really the answer?
9. My ancestral version of photoshop keeps crashing on my computer, so no, I am not able to straighten that picture, and it’s driving me crazy, too.

Some thoughts for Monday:

1. It’s not particularly close to cantaloupe season here, but I’ve still been buying them at the grocery and they’ve been great.

2. As a kid, my parents used to just hand me a spoon and a wedge of cantaloupe and let me have at it. As an adult, I cut my cantaloupe into little wedges so I can eat them out of a bowl with a fork. Adulthood is great. (See above for the cantaloupe cutting technique, which is admittedly pretty basic. You slice the cantaloupe into wedges, cut out the seeds, make a bunch of vertical cuts, then slice along the peel, then dump your wedges into a bowl.)

3. How to tell if it’s ripe: the stem end will smell cantaloupey. The stem end should also yield slightly to pressure, but not be mushy. As a whole, your cantaloupe should not be soft or mushy. I try to find ones that are evenly tan-colored, and not green.

4. Technically, we’re eating netted muskmelons, not cantaloupes.

5. Cantaloupe is the best melon name, by far. (For comparison: watermelon, honeydew, muskmelon, bitter melon).

6. Cantaloupes tainted with listeria killed a bunch of people last year. Some people said that it was a particularly deadly outbreak because cantaloupe is an old-person food, which seems a little like kicking cantaloupe while it’s down to me.

7. The CDC recommends rinsing vegetables and scrubbing hard produce (like melons) with a produce brush to prevent a listeria infection.

8. Will scrubbing with a little brush really get rid of listeria? That seems like maybe just something that the CDC is telling us to do to feel useful, because ultimately if we’re unlucky enough to encounter listeria-tainted food we’re just kind of screwed? Or is the produce brush really the answer?

9. My ancestral version of photoshop keeps crashing on my computer, so no, I am not able to straighten that picture, and it’s driving me crazy, too.

Filed under cantaloupe