vrai-lean-uh

Cooking, eating, making sweeping pronouncements

Posts tagged chicken

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Kebabs!

My life changed last year when I discovered vegetable kebabs. How did I never know that you could cut vegetables into chunks, toss them with oil, salt, and pepper, thread them onto a skewer, and shove them on the grill to create a delicious side dish? It’s as easy as the very easiest salad, and so much more satisfying.

All kebabs all the time! I made kebabs every time we broke out the grill! I made them with zucchinis and summer squashes and onions and peppers. I made them with green peppers which I don’t really even like and yet sticking them on a skewer on the grill made them delicious.

And then I realized that if you put enough stuff on the skewer, you don’t need the burger at all.

So this recipe for pineapple and chicken kebabs from the Boston Globe magazine really came at just the right time for me.*

The first time I made them (pictured above) I think I departed enough from the recipe that I can’t really claim to have made the recipe. They were still crazy good. CRAZY GOOD.

The only downside is that they involve cutting raw chicken into chunks, which is just about my least favorite thing ever. The texture is not good. But if you can get past that, you have a delicious weeknight dinner.

Also worth noting: I always make too many kebabs. This says it makes 12. If you cut the recipe in half, you get 5 or 6, which is a lot of food for two people. On the other hand, it makes good leftovers, particularly when reheated with rice.

Chicken and Pineapple Kebabs

(You can also cook this on a baking sheet under the broiler. It’ll be a lot juicier, so you probably don’t want to add the bacon, but it’s really good.)

Glaze

  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice (about half a lime. It’s not worth measuring.)
  • 1/4 teaspoon hot sauce

Spice Rub for Chicken

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons chili powder (this is NOT the same as ground chilies, it’s a spice mix and less hot. That’s a pretty important distinction.)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika (I used regular paprika)
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder (I didn’t have this the first time I made the recipe and simply omitted it. I didn’t notice a huge difference when I made it again with the onion powder. That said, if you’re near Portland, you can buy a small amount of onion powder in the bulk spice section of Whole Foods, so you’re not saddled with a whole bottle of it.)
  • Salt and black pepper

Other ingredients

  • 2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into chunks (DO NOT use chicken breasts. The recipe kind of depends upon the juiciness of the thighs.)
  • 2 large orange bell peppers, cut into squares (You could also use red, or yellow. I just wouldn’t use green.)
  • 1 large red onion, cut into chunks
  • 12 slices thick-cut bacon, each cut crosswise into 3 pieces (I didn’t have bacon when I made this on the grill and it was still wonderful, but I imagine the bacon would have been spectacular.)
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (friends, do not measure out the olive oil, just pour it onto the vegetables until it looks like enough. Nobody has time for that.)
  • 1 large pineapple, trimmed, cored, and cut into chunks**

1. In a small bowl, whisk the molasses, lime juice, and hot sauce and set aside.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk the spice rub ingredients: the chili powder, brown sugar, paprika, onion powder, and 2 teaspoons each salt and black pepper. Add the chicken and toss to coat. (You can do steps 1 and 2 ahead of time and keep everything in the fridge)

3. Prepare a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill.

4. In a large bowl, toss the bell peppers, onion, and bacon with the oil and salt and black pepper to taste. Thread the chicken, onion, bacon, pineapple, and bell peppers onto the skewers.

5. Grill the kebabs, turning every 3 minutes, until the bell peppers, onion, and pineapple are grill-marked and the chicken is cooked through, about 15 minutes total. Brush kebabs all over with the glaze and grill for about 45 seconds longer on each side (in other words, turn quickly so you don’t burn the glaze). Remove the kebabs from the grill, allow to rest briefly, and serve.

* Technically I think it came in May last year, but I rediscovered it buried in a pile of clipped recipes a few months ago.

** If you’re halving the recipe, you’ll have a leftover 1/2 pineapple. Here is what you do: cut the pineapple into rings and sprinkle generously with cinnamon. Place the pineapple slices onto the grill once the kebabs are done and let them cook in the residual heat as you eat dinner. Then serve with vanilla ice cream. If you have leftover grilled pineapple slices, serve them over yogurt in the morning.

Filed under grilling pineapple chicken I wrote kebab too many times and now it sounds weird

56 notes

My Mum’s Chicken Salad
This is probably the least cool post I have ever had on my tumblr, which is saying a lot, because approximately half the posts on my tumblr are objectively uncool. First, it’s about chicken salad. Second, it’s my mum’s chicken salad recipe, not even some newfangled hipster chicken salad with sriracha. Third, it’s illustrated with what turns out to be a blurry phone photo so it’s hard to get much detail beyond it looking like a lumpy beige mass. Fourth, the key cooking technique here is poaching, which you would be surprised still exists as a legitimate way of rendering meats edible given the amount of media coverage it gets.
While the rest of you are grilling shit I’m just going to be over here gently simmering my skinless boneless chicken breasts in water, thanks.
It’s really good chicken salad, though. Fantastic in a sandwich, but also great on its own.
And here’s the deal on poaching: it’s super uncool, but it’s a great for things like chicken salad, because the meat comes out evenly cooked and really moist.
My mum wrote out this recipe for me at some point when I was in college and she was worried about my being able to feed myself (not an unfair concern: there was a year or so when I subsisted on frozen peas, carrots and dip, takeout from a nearby Japanese restaurant, toast with taramasalata and tomatoes, and ice cream. And vodka cranberries. I weighed less in college.)
Poach the Chicken
2 skinless, boneless chicken breasts
(optional: 1/2 an onion, chopped; 1 carrot, cut up; 1 stalk celery, cut up; some parsley)
Combine the chicken and any of the aromatics in a pan. Cover with water. Cook slowly at a simmer until the chicken is somewhat resistant when pressed— it will continue to cook a bit once you take it off the heat— take off heat and let cool in broth.
Prepare Salad
Poached chicken
2 cups seedless grapes, cut in half (my mum does not specify that the grapes have to be cut in half, but they always are, and it really dramatically improves the salad-eating experience)
1/2 - 1 cup slivered almonds
1/2 - 1 cup thinly sliced celery
For dressing:
1/2 cup mayo
1/2 cup sour cream
1 teaspoon curry powder (or to taste)
salt and pepper
(This, by the way, is where my mum’s recipe ends, because while I think she didn’t want me to starve, it was also beyond her ability to imagine that I couldn’t figure out the next steps on my own. This is the same reason my grandmother’s pie crust recipe includes only a very rough list of ingredients.)
Combine the dressing ingredients in a large bowl. Taste and adjust seasoning.
Cut up or shred the chicken. Add the chicken and salad ingredients to the dressing and toss to coat.

My Mum’s Chicken Salad

This is probably the least cool post I have ever had on my tumblr, which is saying a lot, because approximately half the posts on my tumblr are objectively uncool. First, it’s about chicken salad. Second, it’s my mum’s chicken salad recipe, not even some newfangled hipster chicken salad with sriracha. Third, it’s illustrated with what turns out to be a blurry phone photo so it’s hard to get much detail beyond it looking like a lumpy beige mass. Fourth, the key cooking technique here is poaching, which you would be surprised still exists as a legitimate way of rendering meats edible given the amount of media coverage it gets.

While the rest of you are grilling shit I’m just going to be over here gently simmering my skinless boneless chicken breasts in water, thanks.

It’s really good chicken salad, though. Fantastic in a sandwich, but also great on its own.

And here’s the deal on poaching: it’s super uncool, but it’s a great for things like chicken salad, because the meat comes out evenly cooked and really moist.

My mum wrote out this recipe for me at some point when I was in college and she was worried about my being able to feed myself (not an unfair concern: there was a year or so when I subsisted on frozen peas, carrots and dip, takeout from a nearby Japanese restaurant, toast with taramasalata and tomatoes, and ice cream. And vodka cranberries. I weighed less in college.)

Poach the Chicken

  • 2 skinless, boneless chicken breasts
  • (optional: 1/2 an onion, chopped; 1 carrot, cut up; 1 stalk celery, cut up; some parsley)

Combine the chicken and any of the aromatics in a pan. Cover with water. Cook slowly at a simmer until the chicken is somewhat resistant when pressed— it will continue to cook a bit once you take it off the heat— take off heat and let cool in broth.

Prepare Salad

  • Poached chicken
  • 2 cups seedless grapes, cut in half (my mum does not specify that the grapes have to be cut in half, but they always are, and it really dramatically improves the salad-eating experience)
  • 1/2 - 1 cup slivered almonds
  • 1/2 - 1 cup thinly sliced celery

For dressing:

  • 1/2 cup mayo
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder (or to taste)
  • salt and pepper

(This, by the way, is where my mum’s recipe ends, because while I think she didn’t want me to starve, it was also beyond her ability to imagine that I couldn’t figure out the next steps on my own. This is the same reason my grandmother’s pie crust recipe includes only a very rough list of ingredients.)

Combine the dressing ingredients in a large bowl. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Cut up or shred the chicken. Add the chicken and salad ingredients to the dressing and toss to coat.

Filed under chicken salad

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Roast Chicken with Saffron, Ginger, and Currants

Illustration from Joy of Cooking. It depicts “preparing an undrawn bird for roasting” which is not the same as loosening the skin from the meat, but I couldn’t resist including it anyway.

In any relationship, there is one person who is less revolted by the idea of shoving their hand up underneath the skin of a raw chicken. I did not think I was that person, but apparently I find it less objectionable than Dave does. Are you that person in your relationship? Congratulations, you are now the person who stuffs seasonings into pockets in the chicken skin. This is part of your life now. You may add it to your resume.

I bring this up because stuffing seasonings under the skin of chicken allows the skin to crisp better and infuses the meat with more flavor than just coating the skin. It’s incredibly effective.

And I would highly recommend trying it with this recipe from A Bird in the Oven and Then Some by Mindy Fox, which I totally bastardized when I was trying to put together dinner without resorting to lemon mustard chicken AGAIN but was still revelatory.

Roast Chicken with Saffron, Ginger, and Golden Raisins

  • 1 whole chicken (I used chicken legs I think)
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 orange (I did not have an orange, I’m sure it’s better with the orange)
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins, soaked in boiling water to cover for 1 minute and drained (read also, 1/4 cup currants, straight from the little plastic container)
  • 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon saffron threads
  • 1/ 2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • flakey coarse sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup dry white wine (which I totally forgot about and only just realized was part of the recipe now, re-reading)

Preheat oven to 425.

Prepare the seasoning: Cut the butter up into pieces and put in a bowl. Zest the orange into the bowl. Add the raisins, ginger, garlic, saffron, and coriander. Mix together. My butter was pretty cold, so I used one of those pastry cutter dealies to mix things together.

Pull of excess fat around the cavities of the chicken and discard. From the edge of the cavity, wriggle your fingers up under the skin of the chicken and loosen the skin from the meat. You may have to get in here with some kitchen shears or a knife if you have a hard time getting around the membranes that attach the skin to the meat. This is basically terrible, but you get more used to it the more you do it.

Using your hands, work the butter into the spaces between the chicken skin and meat. You can rub your hand over the outside of the skin to smooth the mixture out and push it farther down between the skin and meat.

Season with salt and pepper.

What I did: I put the chicken thighs on a roasting pan with some cut up root vegetables and cooked the whole thing until done.

The recipe directions: Roast for 15 minutes, then pour the wine over the chicken, reduce the heat to 350, and continue to roast, basting every 15 minutes until the juices run clear when the thigh is pierced with a fork, or an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh reads 165. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board and let rest for 5 minutes, then carve.

This is so wonderfully good, even my bastardized version.

Filed under dinner chicken marriage

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Chicken with Olives

Last week I was so disappointed by roast chicken, but lo! how things have changed!

Every year at Christmas, I accidentally end up with extra gifts. Mostly I get carried away with how wonderful this thing or another would be for someone but then when push comes to shove not be totally clear who “someone” is (it is me). This year, I ended up with the cookbook A Bird in the Oven and Then Some by Mindy Fox. In theory I bought it as a gift, but it turns out I bought it for me. The premise is ridiculous: a whole book about roast chicken. However, there’s a wide range of recipes and they looked wonderful and the paper is nice and thick and the fonts are all really nice.

I made the parsnip soup from the book a little while back, which was delicious, and then last night I made the recipe for Roast Chicken with Green Olives, Fennel Seeds, and Thyme. I feel vindicated in my purchase.

For the roast chicken, basically you chop up 1 cup chopped green olives, 2 1/2 tablespoons fresh thyme, 1 garlic clove (read: two), the zest of two lemons, and 1 3/4 teaspoons fennel seeds and stuff it all under the skin of a chicken. Then you roast the chicken.

I used the roast chicken recipe I normally use for the actual cooking.

Here’s a tip regarding stuffing things under chicken skin: cookbooks like to tell you that you can just loosen the skin with your fingers. That is total bullshit. Skin is attached to the meat. That’s how skin works. I find it easier if I can get it there with a knife or kitchen shears and just snip the membranes (are they membranes? I don’t know) that attach the skin to the meat. Then you can loosen with your fingers.

It would also be good to note whether you have any small cuts on your hands before doing this, because stuffing olive, garlic, and lemon mixtures into tight spaces with your hands is not super comfortable if you have small cuts on there.

Those whole thing is more of a hassle than just roasting a chicken, but it’s delicious and I am sick of plain roasted chicken by now. It would be perfect for a casual dinner party.

Filed under chicken dinner

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Chicken with Artichokes and Angel Hair

So…I made this the other night. I used regular spaghetti because that’s what I had and regular chicken breasts that I deboned and skinned myself because I think purchasing chicken cutlets is RIDICULOUS.

Beyond that, it was amazing.

I mean, god, dinner can be hard. It happens every day! After work! You have to work and then you have to cook dinner. And you’re supposed to eat healthy things, too. I have a few easy dinner fall-backs, but they tend to involve a lot of cream (for instance, and also).

This, though, man, this is so good and it doesn’t even involve cream. It has so much flavor. It is not hard to make.

Bravo, Martha Stewart.*

* Or, rather, chefs and food people who work for Martha Stewart.

Filed under dinner chicken I want to eat this all the time

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In between dealing with my sort of pathetic dog (he has a t-shirt now in addition to the cone because he figured out how to scratch with his back legs*) and reblogging amusing things from the internet, I’ve also been cooking new things!**
Later I will tell you about the lamb with pomegranate molasses and also the greek chicken baked in yogurt, but first: the roasted fennel, chickpeas, peppers, and more peppers, plus leftover chicken thighs. It’s inspired by this recipe (that’s a nicer way of saying, I meant to make that recipe, but then didn’t have all the ingredients, and had other ingredients, and then started improvising). It’s crazy simple.
The deal:
Roasted Fennel, Chickpeas, Peppers, and More Peppers, Plus Leftover Chicken Wings and Thighs
2 sets chicken thighs and wings (leftover from the whole chicken whose breasts went toward the greek chicken in yogurt the night before)
2 yellow or red peppers
1 fennel bulb
2 garlic cloves
1 handful of peppadew peppers (the sweet, jarred kind, which were an impulse buy at Micucci's a little while back because they were out of the pizza and didn't have fresh lasagna noodles)
14 oz. chickpeas (two cups or so)
olive oil, salt, pepper
Optional chicken topping: balsamic vinegar, mustard, honey
1. Preheat oven to 400F or 425F.
2. Slice up the peppers, fennel, peppadew peppers. Toss with olive oil and salt and pepper. When I cooked this tonight, I tossed in the garlic and chickpeas, but because they cook faster than everything else, and I like my vegetables well done, the chickpeas got a little dried out. In the future, I’ll add the chickpeas and garlic a little later. Salt and pepper the chicken.
3. Divide the vegetables and chicken over two cookie sheets and set the timer for 30 minutes or so.
4. After 10 minutes, you could add the chickpeas and garlic.
5. After 20 minutes (with 10 minutes left), mix the maybe a tablespoon or two of the vinegar, a little bit of mustard (a teaspoon?) and a little bit of honey (less than a teaspoon?). Brush that on the chicken.
6. Pop everything back in for the remaining 10 minutes.
7. Enjoy the deliciousness.
* And we may have to get him baby socks for his back legs and apply cortisone cream to the parts of his belly that he’s scratching THROUGH THE T-SHIRT. On the other hand, he likes to snuggle up in your lap even with his cone on, so he just kind of plows the cone straight into your chest and assumes that you’ll help him figure it out. Which is both kind of uncomfortable and heart-meltingly sweet.
** And, you know, doing my job.
(Photo from Whole Living magazine)

In between dealing with my sort of pathetic dog (he has a t-shirt now in addition to the cone because he figured out how to scratch with his back legs*) and reblogging amusing things from the internet, I’ve also been cooking new things!**

Later I will tell you about the lamb with pomegranate molasses and also the greek chicken baked in yogurt, but first: the roasted fennel, chickpeas, peppers, and more peppers, plus leftover chicken thighs. It’s inspired by this recipe (that’s a nicer way of saying, I meant to make that recipe, but then didn’t have all the ingredients, and had other ingredients, and then started improvising). It’s crazy simple.

The deal:

Roasted Fennel, Chickpeas, Peppers, and More Peppers, Plus Leftover Chicken Wings and Thighs

  • 2 sets chicken thighs and wings (leftover from the whole chicken whose breasts went toward the greek chicken in yogurt the night before)
  • 2 yellow or red peppers
  • 1 fennel bulb
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 handful of peppadew peppers (the sweet, jarred kind, which were an impulse buy at Micucci's a little while back because they were out of the pizza and didn't have fresh lasagna noodles)
  • 14 oz. chickpeas (two cups or so)
  • olive oil, salt, pepper
  • Optional chicken topping: balsamic vinegar, mustard, honey

1. Preheat oven to 400F or 425F.

2. Slice up the peppers, fennel, peppadew peppers. Toss with olive oil and salt and pepper. When I cooked this tonight, I tossed in the garlic and chickpeas, but because they cook faster than everything else, and I like my vegetables well done, the chickpeas got a little dried out. In the future, I’ll add the chickpeas and garlic a little later. Salt and pepper the chicken.

3. Divide the vegetables and chicken over two cookie sheets and set the timer for 30 minutes or so.

4. After 10 minutes, you could add the chickpeas and garlic.

5. After 20 minutes (with 10 minutes left), mix the maybe a tablespoon or two of the vinegar, a little bit of mustard (a teaspoon?) and a little bit of honey (less than a teaspoon?). Brush that on the chicken.

6. Pop everything back in for the remaining 10 minutes.

7. Enjoy the deliciousness.

* And we may have to get him baby socks for his back legs and apply cortisone cream to the parts of his belly that he’s scratching THROUGH THE T-SHIRT. On the other hand, he likes to snuggle up in your lap even with his cone on, so he just kind of plows the cone straight into your chest and assumes that you’ll help him figure it out. Which is both kind of uncomfortable and heart-meltingly sweet.

** And, you know, doing my job.

(Photo from Whole Living magazine)

Filed under dinner chicken chickpeas

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And soon both your children are tearing their way through that bizarre and distasteful item, chicken on the bone.

You know how much I dislike the New York Times magazine’s Recipe Redux series? As much as I dislike Recipe Redux, I adore the series that it alternates with, Cooking with Dexter by Pete Wells.

It’s funny, well-written, the recipes are good, and it feels very practical for home cooks. In addition, Wells gets, and can express through his writing, the crazy idiosyncrasies, deeply-held convictions, and tyrannical leanings of small children. He won me over about a year ago with an article about tangerine sherbet. It’s incredibly funny and includes an unspeakably delicious recipe for tangerine sherbet.

The fried chicken recipe that he includes with this week’s article sounds delicious, but for some reason (the burning hot oil? the potential for spattering?) I am petrified of deep frying things at home. So…we’ll see.

Filed under cooking with dexter chicken bizarre and distasteful items

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Chicken Livers

I have come to believe that if you eat chicken regularly, knowing how to break down a chicken is maybe one of the most valuable cooking skills you could have.* You just get so much more when you buy the whole chicken. Case in point:

Our dog occasionally gets some intestinal distress (don’t we all?), and according to our vet, if your dog gets diarrhea, you should feed them chicken and rice and most of the time that will clear everything up. Basically, you poach some skinless, boneless chicken (you don’t want fat here) and then mix it up with rice. And you know, it really works.  I’m going to be away for a bit next week, so I’m making up a batch of chicken and rice to freeze in case things go awry again.

Do you all know how much boneless, skinless chicken breasts cost a pound? Something like $6. That’s crazy talk. I’m not spending $6 a pound on meat for dog food.

On the other hand, a whole chicken costs something like $2 - $3 a pound. If you buy yourself a whole chicken, you can get your chicken breasts for the dog food, plus legs and wings for chili and honey chicken legs for dinner, plus a carcass that can be made into stock, all for $10 or so. With all that money you saved, you can buy yourself a small- to medium-sized hunk of gruyere.** You win!

Generally I keep the chicken neck for stock, but have sort of been at a loss as to what to do with the remaining giblets. Not today, though. Today I stood at my kitchen counter with my baggie of assorted chicken bits and decided, I’m going to do something with these chicken livers. I don’t care if it’s eating them myself, or giving them to the dog, but they are not getting thrown away.

I would have added them to the dog food, except they’re really rich, which kind of defeats the whole point of bland dog food.

So I wiped out the skillet I had used to poach the chicken breasts, added half a pat of butter, then some chopped shallots which I cooked until they were translucent, then added the livers and cooked until they were browned. It was crazy delicious. And I ate them all before Dave got home because he finds chicken livers revolting.

This is the kind of excitement you get when you live with me. Let me tell you, it is awesome.

* Behind knowing how to chop up an onion which is REALLY IMPORTANT. Here is an illustrated tutorial. If you do not know how to do this, you must go to read this tutorial right now. I cannot say that strongly enough.

** What I did.

Filed under chicken

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Dinner in Two Parts

1. Chicken thighs with marmalade are delicious.  Line a baking sheet with foil, then pop the chicken thighs or legs on there, salt and pepper and stick in the oven at 400 or so.  After 10 - 15 minutes, spread some marmalade over the chicken thighs.  Continue to cook until chicken is done.  You can finish with 2 - 4 minutes in the broiler. 

I’m not sure this is exactly life-changing, but I do have a large amount of marmalade at home and I wouldn’t say no to a two-ingredient dinner.*

I have spoken the gospel of chicken legs before, but just in case you missed it: chicken legs are fantastic.  They’re more flavorful and less dry than chicken breasts, and they’re generally cheaper, too.

Save the bones in a baggie in your freezer for making stock later.

2. Sausages cooked in honey and mustard are also delicious.  Theoretically, you’d bake the sausages, covered with a mix of approximately half honey and half mustard, in the oven, again on a baking sheet lined with foil at approx. 400.  If you’ve purchased brats, you could stick everything in a skillet on relatively high heat to warm and make the honey mustard more glaze-like.  Obviously these are to be eaten with homemade sauerkraut.

* Note: this is not really a two-ingredient dinner, unless you’re eating chicken and nothing else for dinner.  Now, I’m not above this, it’s just not a great way to feel particularly healthy. 

Filed under dinner chicken sauerkraut

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I appreciate a fancy dinner as much as the next lady, but I also appreciate a dinner that involves sticking one pan in the oven for 30 minutes and leaving well enough alone.
I haven’t made this recipe for chili and honey chicken legs in a while, but we had a chicken that needed to be eaten, and I didn’t feel like roasting the whole bird.  Chicken legs are really good— they have a lot more flavor and moisture than the breast, generally, and this is a great recipe for them, both really flavorful and straightforward.  So I cut that sucker up, froze the breast to eat later and the back and neck for stock, which left me with the legs and winglets for dinner.
In terms of vegetables, we had cabbage, a sweet potato, and a delicata squash.  I figured the seasonings for the chicken wouldn’t taste so bad with the sweet potato and squash and I could cook them in the same pan as the chicken.
Here’s how you do:
Chili and Honey Chicken Legs
2 tablespoons chili powder (not pure chile powder)
1 tablespoon mild honey*
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
whole chicken legs and wings
sweet potato, delicata squash, and whatever else you’ve got for roasting, cut up into 1” pieces.
1. Preheat oven to 425 and place the oven rack in the upper 1/3 of the oven.  Line bottom of a cookie sheet or roasting pan with foil.  DO NOT FORGET THE FOIL.  Recipe is considerably less easy if you spent half an hour scrubbing out your pan post-dinner.2. Stir together the chili powder, honey, lime juice, salt, and pepper in a bowl. 3. Separate the thighs from the drumsticks if you haven’t already.  Add chicken to the chili sauce and turn to coat.  Put the chicken on one side of the foil-lined pan.4. Toss the vegetables in a bit of olive oil and then the remaining sauce.  Add them to the other side of the pan (it’s nice to separate them a bit in case the chicken is done before the vegetables or vice versa, then you can scoop out whatever’s done).5. Cook for 25 - 35 minutes until chicken is cooked through and vegetables are tender.* I don’t know why they call for mild honey.  We used our regular honey, which is not so mild, and it was fine.  With all the chili powder, I don’t think the nuances of the honey flavor are going to matter much.
Photo from Gourmet, via Epicurious

I appreciate a fancy dinner as much as the next lady, but I also appreciate a dinner that involves sticking one pan in the oven for 30 minutes and leaving well enough alone.

I haven’t made this recipe for chili and honey chicken legs in a while, but we had a chicken that needed to be eaten, and I didn’t feel like roasting the whole bird.  Chicken legs are really good— they have a lot more flavor and moisture than the breast, generally, and this is a great recipe for them, both really flavorful and straightforward.  So I cut that sucker up, froze the breast to eat later and the back and neck for stock, which left me with the legs and winglets for dinner.

In terms of vegetables, we had cabbage, a sweet potato, and a delicata squash.  I figured the seasonings for the chicken wouldn’t taste so bad with the sweet potato and squash and I could cook them in the same pan as the chicken.

Here’s how you do:

Chili and Honey Chicken Legs

  • 2 tablespoons chili powder (not pure chile powder)
  • 1 tablespoon mild honey*
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • whole chicken legs and wings
  • sweet potato, delicata squash, and whatever else you’ve got for roasting, cut up into 1” pieces.
1. Preheat oven to 425 and place the oven rack in the upper 1/3 of the oven.  Line bottom of a cookie sheet or roasting pan with foil.  DO NOT FORGET THE FOIL.  Recipe is considerably less easy if you spent half an hour scrubbing out your pan post-dinner.

2. Stir together the chili powder, honey, lime juice, salt, and pepper in a bowl.

3. Separate the thighs from the drumsticks if you haven’t already.  Add chicken to the chili sauce and turn to coat.  Put the chicken on one side of the foil-lined pan.
4. Toss the vegetables in a bit of olive oil and then the remaining sauce.  Add them to the other side of the pan (it’s nice to separate them a bit in case the chicken is done before the vegetables or vice versa, then you can scoop out whatever’s done).
5. Cook for 25 - 35 minutes until chicken is cooked through and vegetables are tender.

* I don’t know why they call for mild honey.  We used our regular honey, which is not so mild, and it was fine.  With all the chili powder, I don’t think the nuances of the honey flavor are going to matter much.

Photo from Gourmet, via Epicurious

Filed under dinner chicken